Team 4

Coach: Travis Keever

 

#5:5’0 ’23 Ashton Dillon (Asheville, NC)

Starting things off, we look at a player that stood out with his strong energy level throughout camp, Ashton Dillon. He’s a slightly undersized guard prospect that looks to disrupt the opposition in any way possible. Dillon handled the ball well and displayed solid vision in transition. Next in his development process is working on his ability to shoot off the dribble, as it would make him a more dangerous offensive threat. Coach Keever on Dillon: “Ashton has a positive attitude but needs to slow down. He’s a willing passer that plays good defense. He can work on being stronger and using pivots and ball-fakes. Ashton is a very willing listener. He can work on moving without the ball better and keeping his emotions in check so it won’t affect his game.” Dillon showed some solid skills during his time at camp and could be a quality contributor if he continues to work.

 

#7: 5’3 ’24 Cole Barr (Bristol, TN)

Next, we look at a player that was able to make solid two-way contributions during his time at camp, Cole Barr. He’s a wiry guard prospect that played with quality effort and energy on both ends of the floor. Barr shot the ball well from midrange and proved to be a great finisher for his size. He forced multiple turnovers on defense with his off-ball instincts and ability to jump into passing lanes. Next in his development process is working on his ability to move without the ball, as it would allow him to score with more regularity. Coach Keever on Barr: “Cole needs to be more aggressive. He has a very good jumper, he just needs to work on his ability to penetrate. He needs to continually be moving to maximize his game. Cole has a lot of scoring potential and gave very good defensive effort, but can get lost at times on offense.” Barr enjoyed a quality showing at camp and should steadily progress over these next few years.

 

#14:5’5 ’26 Camden Hayworth (Kingsport, TN)

Moving onto a player that displayed a solid foundation and quality amount of polish for his age, Camden Hayworth. He’s a young guard prospect with a solid feel for the game and the ability to get to the basket with solid regularity. Hayworth proved to be a capable spot-up threat from beyond the arc and did a nice job of attacking closeouts whenever possible. Next in his development process is working to tighten his handle, as it would make him a more reliable creator for himself and others. Coach Keever on Hayworth: “Camden is skilled but needs to work on his strength and speed. He can also turn up his motor. He has the skills but needs to get to a high effort in order to impact the game at all times.” Hayworth was the youngest player on his team and did a great job of competing against bigger/stronger opponents throughout the day.

 

#15: 5’5 ’24 Peyton Rodriguez (Hendersonville, NC)

Continuing onto a player that highlighted a pretty useful foundation and team-first approach during his time at camp, Peyton Rodriguez. He’s a wiry guard prospect that doesn’t force the action on either end of the floor. Rodriguez stood out on defense with his off-ball instincts and ability to force turnovers, which led to easy transition buckets. Next in his development process is working on the release on his jumper, as it would make him a more consistent shooting threat against defensive pressure. Coach Keever on Rodriguez: “Peyton plays hard but can continue working on handling defensive pressure with the ball in his hands and finishing in traffic. He’s a good team defender that rebounds well. He has the skill, but needs to build confidence. Peyton passes the ball well and does a great job of keeping the ball moving to open cutters.” Rodriguez worked hard and proved to be a quality teammate that could become an intriguing prospect over the next few years.

 

#22: 5’7 ’24 Brock Smelser (Rural Retreat, VA)

Next, we look at a player that showcased a pretty polished two-way skillset for his age, Brock Smelser. He’s a strong-bodied wing prospect that welcomes physical play and operates nicely within the team concept. Smelser displayed the ability to attack the basket while constantly outworking opponents for rebounds on both sides of the ball. Next in his development process is working on his ability to move without the ball, as it would allow him to become a more reliable spot-up threat. Coach Keever on Smelser: “Brock is physical and very athletic. He has good shot mechanics and finishes well in traffic. He’s a competitor that doesn’t like to lose. He needs to continue working on his ball-handling and court awareness. His ability to get to the rim is great, but needs to work on finishing.” Smelser displayed a lot of useful tools during his time at camp and could emerge as a prospect to watch going forward.

 

#24: 5’7 ’23 Caleb Senyo (Fletcher, NC)

Moving onto a player that really stood out with his strong balance between scoring and playmaking, Caleb Senyo. He’s a smart, wiry guard prospect that plays with toughness and knows how to make plays for himself and others. Senyo utilizes his tight handle to get by opponents and to the rim with relative ease, where he’s proven to be a solid finisher. Next in his development process is working to add strength, as it would allow him to absorb more contact when attacking the basket. Coach Keever on Senyo: “Caleb plays hard and does a great job of facilitating to others. He needs to work on his outside shot, but finishes well when attacking the basket. Caleb plays scrappy and doesn’t back down from a challenge. He needs to work on passing off the dribble and moving without the ball, but could become a terrific guard with the ability to play either backcourt spot.” Senyo showed a lot of polish during his time at camp and has the necessary tools to become a really productive floor general in the near future.

 

#32: 5’9 ’23 Charlie Daniels (Wise, VA)

Continuing onto a player that possesses a pretty well-rounded skillset on both ends of the floor, Charlie Daniels. He’s a wiry wing prospect that plays with a strong motor and looks to disrupt opponents however possible. Daniels is a capable scorer but typically gets most of his points from rebounds and transition play. He is a quality rebounder for his size and knows how to pass the ball to open teammates. Next in his development process is working on his consistency from three-point territory, as it would make him a more complete offensive threat. Coach Keever on Daniels: “Charlie is a competitor that is willing to take the tough matchup. He’s a strong finisher that moves well without the ball. He’s scrappy with a nose for the ball. He needs to build confidence in his jumper. Charlie plays bigger than he looks.” Daniels enjoyed a pretty productive showing at camp and could be a quality contributor during his upcoming freshman season.

 

#33: 5’10 ’23 Casey Dotson (Wise, VA)

Next, we look at a player that offered his team a terrific two-way presence while operating within the team concept, Casey Dotson. He’s a long, wiry forward prospect with deceptive quickness and three-level scoring ability. Dotson plays tough on both ends of the floor, absorbing contact, fighting for rebounds, and constantly working for extra possessions. He’s a quality defender that forced numerous turnovers and pushed transition play during his time at camp. Next in his development process is working to add strength, as it will make him an even better rebounder. Coach Keever on Dotson: “Casey knows how to compete. He’s scrappy and a good scorer. He has great feel when he plays comfortable. Casey is very crafty when getting to his spots and plays well regardless of situation. He needs to work on his quickness and being aggressive.” Dotson was among the more useful all-around players on his camp team and could be one to watch going forward.

 

#49: 5’11 ’24 Trent Noah (Baxter, KY)

Moving onto a player with an extremely polished all-around skillset and unselfish mentality, Trent Noah. He’s an intelligent, strong-bodied guard/forward prospect that can do it all at the middle school level while playing the right way. Noah can score on all three levels, but also does an exceptional job of setting the floor for others and making crafty reads with the ball. He rebounds the ball at a high level and is unstoppable in transition, considering he’s a walking mismatch. Next in his development process is working to become quicker, as it will make him an even tougher matchup for opponents to handle off the bounce. Coach Keever on Noah: “Trent is extremely skilled and fundamental. He needs to be more aggressive at times, but will be extremely successful either way. He has a great shot but seemed hesitant to step out today. He needs to get in the post and take advantage of size mismatches. He has the capability to be a matchup problem everywhere on the court, he just needs to take the action.” Noah was one of the most dominant players at camp and has an incredibly bright future, especially if he continues to work.

 

#51: 5’11 ’23 Asher Cunningham (Asheville, NC)

Finishing up, we look at a player that stood out with his unbelievable motor and team-first approach, Asher Cunningham. He’s a strong, athletic forward prospect with leadership qualities and an exceptional feel for rebounding the ball on both ends of the floor. Cunningham does a great job of operating from the elbows-in, scoring and making the extra pass with regularity. Next in his development process is working to become a craftier ball-handler, as it will allow him to create for himself and others with less resistance. Coach Keever on Cunningham: “Asher is physical! He does it all and is a fun kid to coach. He’s a rebounding machine that plays hard. He can get out of control at times but doesn’t back down. He’s a smart player and capable scorer. Asher can really affect the game with defense and rebounding. He brings the whole team up.” Cunningham outworked every opponent in his path and proved to be an excellent teammate throughout camp, so it’ll be exciting to see his progression over the next few years.