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Team 6

Coach: Walker

 

#8:5’4 ’23 Keenan Wilkins (Hendersonville, NC)

Starting things off, we look at a player that has the chance to become a really high-level floor general, Keenan Wilkins. He’s a somewhat undersized point guard with great two-way instincts and an exceptional feel for the game. Wilkins is a smart, unselfish ball-handler that can get by basically any opponent and enter the paint at will. He possesses terrific vision and overall playmaking skills, which allow him to truly manipulate defenses with the ball in his hands. Wilkins is also a capable scorer from all three levels, but doesn’t force the action and knows when to defer to others. Next in his development process is adding strength in order to physically prepare himself for the high school level. Coach Walker on Wilkins: “Keenan is a very coachable kid that listens and tries to apply it to the game. His team play is outstanding, but he could continue working on going left.” Wilkins has a really smooth game and should certainly be a prospect to watch grow going forward, as he could be special.

 

#17:5’7 ’23 Caleb Senyo (Fletcher, NC)

Next, we look at a player that brought an excellent attitude and team-first mentality to camp, Caleb Senyo. He’s a young, wiry guard prospect that can coexist with any group of teammates, given his ability to play without the ball and make an impact. Senyo is a quality shooter that can spot-up and stretch the floor, which draws the attention of opponents. He’s a willing passer and solid all-around teammate, which is especially evident in transition, where he works harder than most everyone on the floor. Senyo displayed great defensive positioning and should be able to better contain his assignment with additional strength. Next in his development process is working to add strength to his wiry frame, as it would likely improve his consistency as a finisher. Coach Walker on Senyo: “Caleb is very coachable and applies coaching to the game. He needs to be more vocal on defense and can become a more consistent finisher when attacking the basket.” Senyo enjoyed a quality showing at camp and should be able to steadily progress over the next few years.

 

#36:5’10 ’21 Dennis Jackson Jr. (Blythewood, SC)

Moving onto a player that showcased a pretty intriguing skillset during his time at camp, Dennis Jackson Jr. He’s a strong-bodied guard prospect that made a quality impression with his ability to get downhill and finish around the basket. Jackson utilizes his size well on both ends of the floor, but can continue to work on his perimeter shooting, as it would cause problems for most types of opponents. He worked hard on defense and was able to force a few turnovers throughout the day, which led to easy transition play. Jackson handles the ball well and is pretty quick for his size. Next in his development process is working on his ability to spot-up, as it would likely help improve his consistency as a perimeter shooter. Coach Walker on Jackson: “Dennis has a great willingness to pass the ball, but has to learn how to attack going left. His transition offense is great.” Jackson is already quite productive, but it’s likely that his best basketball is in the foreseeable future.

 

#48:5’11 ’22 John Gebhard (Irmo, SC)

Continuing onto a player that possesses a very intriguing skillset and clear two-way upside, John Gebhard. He’s a wiry point guard prospect with a natural feel for the game and strong playmaking instincts. Gehbard sees the floor very well and is capable of making crafty reads with great regularity, especially upon entering the paint. He’s an efficient scorer that can spot-up or create for himself, though his perimeter shot is likely his most reliable scoring avenue. Gebhard displays excellent positioning on defense and will become even more imposing when he adds additional strength. Next in his development process is working to become a more reliable penetrator, as he possesses the necessary craftiness to get into the paint more often. Coach Walker on Gebhard: “John is very coachable and plays with great energy with a high motor. He has to play with more aggressiveness.” Gebhard is still just beginning to harness his abilities as a point guard, so it’ll be interesting to see his progression going forward.

 

#52:6’0 ’21 Makarius Epps (Columbia, SC)

Moving onto a player that stood out with his ability to defend and make plays on that side of the ball, Makarius Epps. He’s a long, strong, athletic guard prospect that operated extremely well within the team concept. Epps is a capable scorer, but was at his best when getting downhill and attacking the basket, where he proved to be a useful finisher. He plays with terrific energy and it’s quite evident on defense, where he contains his assignment well and forces turnovers at a solid rate. Next in his development process is working on the use of his off-hand, as it would open up an abundance of easy offensive opportunities. Coach Walker on Epps: “Makarius plays with a great motor on defense, but needs to be more vocal. He was very coachable and applied what was said throughout the game.” Epps played a valuable role for his camp team and should be able to steadily develop over the next few years.

 

#56:6’0 ’22 Amair Davis (Lexington, SC)

Next, we look at player that is truly just beginning to scratch the surface of his long-term abilities, Amair Davis. He’s a long, wiry guard prospect with a team-first approach and a good-looking jumper. Davis plays with great energy and does an excellent job of involving himself in the action. He utilizes his length well on defense to force turnovers and push transition play. Davis has great physical tools and should be able to progress into a very impactful two-way player sooner than later. Next in his development process is working on his transition defense, as he has the necessary ability to shut down opposing fast breaks with the appropriate effort. Coach Walker on Davis: “Amair’s willingness to pass the ball is outstanding. He knows when to shoot and when to pass. He needs to move more without the ball in his hands.” Davis brought a lot of intrigue during his time at camp, so it’ll be interesting to see how he develops going forward.

 

#59:6’0 ’21 Nhazer Little (Albemarle, NC)

Moving onto a player that contributed well on both sides of the ball during his time at camp, Nhazer Little. He’s a well-rounded guard prospect with a quality frame and a nonstop motor, which allows him to make an impact without needing to score. Little is a team-first guy that willingly looks to make hustle plays at all times. He doesn’t look to score very often, but was able to take advantage of open looks in the midrange area. Little utilizes his quickness well to mirror his on-ball assignment, which led to multiple forced turnovers. Next in his development process is working on his consistency as a three-point shooter, as it would make him a much more dynamic offensive threat. Coach Walker on Little: “Nhazer is extremely vocal! He is very coachable, works hard, and willingly hustles while on the court. He needs to work on dribble with his left hand.” Little proved to be a great teammate throughout the day and could become a very productive long-term prospect.

 

#74: 6’2 ’23 Khalil Campbell (Conway, SC)

Continuing onto a player that operated nicely within his role on both sides of the ball, Khalil Campbell. He’s a young, wiry wing prospect that understands how to play within the team concept and make plays when available. Campbell has a solid motor and feel for the game, especially for his age, which allows him to regularly create havoc in transition. He scores the ball effectively off the catch and dribble, but can still become more efficient as a jump shooter. Campbell gives great effort on defense and was able to contain his on-ball assignment quite well. Next in his development process is working on his ability to handle the ball, as it would make him a more complete player. Coach Walker on Campbell: “Khalil has to learn how to move without the ball, but was very coachable and showed an understanding of when to take advantage on offense.” Campbell will be an exciting player to monitor going forward, as he could become a very intriguing prospect with continued work.

 

#78: 6’2 ’22 Russell Branch (Barnwell, SC)

Next, we look at a player that was among the most electric and exciting two-way performers on display, Russell Branch. He’s an intelligent point guard prospect with phenomenal vision and a pretty high-level feel for the game. Branch gets downhill and attacks with great frequency, which allows him to enter the paint and make sharp, decisive reads with the ball in his hands. He’s crafty, unselfish, and always looks to make the smartest possible play. Branch scored the ball pretty well from all three levels, but was at his most efficient when getting to the basket and finishing through contact. He’s also a well-rounded defender with quickness and the ability to force turnovers at a strong rate. Next in his development process is continuing to add strength to his wiry frame, as it’ll make him much more difficult for opponents on both sides of the ball. Coach Walker on Branch: “Russell has a great attitude and proved to be an exceptional playmaker, but can work on attacking while going left.” Branch secured the Mr. Playmaker award in brilliant fashion and should be in the firmly in the “best freshman point guard in the state” conversation.

 

#90: 6’6 ’22 Earl Burgess (Spartanburg, SC)

Moving onto a player that currently sits at an intriguing crossroads between productivity and long-term potential, Earl Burgess. He’s a big, athletic post prospect that plays hard and does a nice job of impacting the action on both sides of the ball. Burgess operates nicely around the basket, displaying quality touch with both hands and highlighting his ability to play above the rim whenever possible. He rebounds effectively and runs the floor with purpose, which led to multiple easy baskets from filling the lane. Burgess is a quality teammate that willingly makes the hustle plays and looks for the open man on offense. Next in his development process is working on the use of his off-hand, as it’ll make him an even more challenging matchup for opposing post players. Coach Walker on Burgess: “Earl is a very coachable player that has a great jumper that he needs to utilize more, especially from midrange. He can also learn to be more aggressive in the post.” Burgess has a chance to be the next “guy” at Dorman, especially if his game continues to expand.

 

#99: 6’0 ’23 Jamar Brokington (Lumberton, NC)

Finishing up, we look at a player that is already productive, but looks likely to continue steadily improving, Jamar Brokington. He’s a young guard prospect with a great frame and a strong team-first mentality. Brokington is able to score reliably from inside the arc, from driving and finishing strong to pulling-up from midrange. He handles the ball well and possesses nice vision, which he utilizes well in transition. Brokington is able to operate with or without the ball and still make an impact. Next in his development process is working on the consistency of his three-point shot, as it would make him a more dynamic offensive threat. Coach Walker on Brokington: “Jamar has a great motor on both ends of the floor. He’s a great finisher at the rim, but can continue to work on his off-hand.” Brokington made an impressive impact with his defensive prowess and has a chance to become a special prospect, especially if he continues to put in the necessary work.