Team 4

Coach: Mel Abrams

 

#7:5’4 ’23 Kaprice Rowan Jr. (Columbia, SC)

Starting things off, we look at a player that showcased a lot of translatable skills during his time at camp, Kaprice Rowan Jr. He’s a young point guard prospect that plays with an impressive motor on both sides of the ball. Rowan proved to be a quality playmaker when attacking the basket, but also shot the ball quite well from midrange and beyond. He took care of the ball and didn’t force the action on offense. Rowan made multiple plays on defense and contained his assignment well, despite his lack of size. Next in his development process is working on his ability to move without the ball, as it would set him up for an abundance of easy scoring opportunities. Coach Abrams on Rowan: “Kaprice has great upside. He handles the ball well and looks to set up teammates. He has solid on-ball defensive skills and a high IQ. Kaprice was very coachable and should have a bright future.” Rowan has a ton of useful qualities, which should allow him to become a great prospect within the next few years.

 

#19:5’7 ’22 Marc Raye (Winston-Salem, NC)

Next, we look at a player that stood out as one of the top playmakers and floor generals at camp, Marc Raye. He’s a young, somewhat undersized point guard prospect with an exceptional feel for the game, which allows him to manipulate and contort defenses with regularity. Raye is a willing passer with great timing and craftiness when attacking the basket. He’s very unselfish, but also showed the ability to efficiently score the ball from all three levels. Raye possesses a long list of leadership qualities and defended quite well despite his lack of true size. Next in his development process is working on his ability to move without the ball, as it would highlight his ability to spot-up and knock down shots along the perimeter. Coach Abrams on Raye: “Marc is a good floor leader. He has strong on-ball defense and great IQ. He’s a good passer with great upside. Moving without the ball is one area that he could improve.” Raye has all the intangibles and qualities necessary to become a special type of prospect, especially if he continues to work.

 

#26:5’8 ’22 Savion Brown (Greenville, SC)

Moving onto a player that stood out with his ability to consistently score the ball from all over the floor, Savion Brown. He’s a wiry guard prospect that operated quite well without the ball, as it allowed him to apply pressure as a spot-up threat from the perimeter. Brown is a solid three-point shooter and overall penetrator, but his midrange shot is easily the most reliable in his arsenal. Brown showed flashes of being able to make plays for others and sees the floor quite well in transition. Next in his development process is working on his overall defensive ability, as he has the necessary tools to become an adequate defender. Coach Abrams on Brown: “Savion has a great skillset offensively. He can shoot it from deep and is a guard that can play with or without the ball. On the other end, he showed potential as well. Savion is a true scorer.” Brown was able to make a pretty strong impact on offense, so it’ll be interesting to see how his defensive presence develops going forward.

 

#38:5’10 ’22 Jefrey Stone (Lexington, SC)

Continuing onto a player that brought an excellent attitude and team-first approach to camp, Jefrey Stone. He’s a young guard prospect that played hard and looked to create havoc however possible. Stone operated nicely within the team concept and deferred to open teammates whenever possible. He did a great job of hitting guys in stride, especially in transition, and could grow into a quality playmaker. Stone utilized his size well when attacking the basket and absorbed contact whenever attempting to finish. Next in his development process is working on establishing a go-to scoring avenue, as it would allow him to take advantage of more offensive opportunities. Coach Abrams on Stone: “Jefrey is a great team player with a great attitude. He has some areas to improve on defensively, but overall is a very coachable player that should continue to improve.” Stone showcased some useful skills and should continue steadily progressing over the next few years, especially if he’s willing to work.

 

#43:5’10 ’20 Sam Laydon (Charleston, SC)

Next, we look at a player that showcased his ability to coexist and find success with any group of teammates, Sam Laydon. He’s a smart guard prospect that is capable of making an impact with or without the ball in his hands, given his blend of playmaking and spot-up abilities. Laydon operates nicely within the team concept and typically looks to make the right play, but is also able to generate shots for himself at a pretty solid rate. Laydon positions himself well on defense to contain his assignment and accumulated numerous steals through jumping into passing lanes. Next in his development process is working to add strength, as it would make him a more reliable finisher. Coach Abrams on Laydon: “Sam is a great team player that moves well coming off of screens. He has a good stroke from beyond the arc. I think he can play both guard positions. I would like to see him continue to work on his defensive intensity.” Laydon is a well-rounded player that will be able to make plays with any group of teammates, so it’ll be interesting to monitor his production throughout his upcoming senior season.

 

#53:6’0 ’22 Jalen Gibson (Simpsonville, SC)

Moving onto a player that was easily among the top two-way performers on this team, Jalen Gibson. He’s a young, strong-bodied guard prospect with a solid feel for the game and a well-rounded understanding of his skillset. Gibson is pretty quick for his size and gets by the point of attack with regularity. He finishes strong through contact at the rim, but also showcased a reliable pull-up jumper from the midrange area. Gibson’s motor and overall feel for the game were quite evident defensively, as he was able to mirror his assignment for most of the day. He was also among the top rebounders on this team and frequently outworked bigger/stronger players on the glass. Next in his development process is working on his ability to move without the ball, as it would make him a more useful spot-up threat. Coach Abrams on Gibson: “Jalen is a very hard worker with a quick first step. He does a good job of dribble-penetration and finishing strong. He also rebounds well. Effort and energy on defense is something he brings consistently.” There’s a lot to like with Gibson, which should make his high school journey worth monitoring, especially if he continues to improve.

 

#67: 6’2 ’21 Robert Price (Pageland, SC)

Continuing onto a player that basically served as the main glue-guy for this team throughout camp, Robert Price. He’s a physically-advanced guard prospect that plays with energy and relentlessness on both sides of the ball. Price is smart and operates nicely within the team concept, offering a strong balance between scoring and playmaking. He attacked the basket fairly well, but preferred to apply pressure from the midrange area. Price defended extremely well and was able to switch across multiple positions due to his energy and strength. He also proved to be a terrific two-way rebounder that pushed transition play whenever possible. Next in his development process is working on his ability to shoot off the dribble, as it would make him a more dynamic offensive threat. Coach Abrams on Price: “Robert plays with great energy and effort. He has good speed and strength and uses his body/physical abilities well. He rebounds well and has shown that he’s able to make plays in the open court. He has a great frame and his perimeter shooting should continue to improve with added work.” Price already has a great foundation and skillset, which should allow him to become a major contributor for his high school team sooner than later.

 

#69: 6’2 ’22 Christian Ferguson (West Columbia, SC)

Next, we look at a player that was among the most intriguing two-way performers in attendance, Christian Ferguson. He’s a long, wiry forward/post prospect with quality IQ and the ability to overwhelm his assignment on both sides of the ball. Ferguson was arguably the best rim-protector on display, as he seemed to have a nonstop flow of blocked shots and alterations near the basket—without fouling. He has a great motor and nose for the ball, which allowed him to secure extra possessions and second-chance opportunities throughout the day. Ferguson is more versatile on offense than opponents expect, which allows him to handle the ball in transition and make plays in moderation. Next in his development process is working to add strength to his wiry frame, as it would allow him to play more physical on both sides of the ball. Coach Abrams on Ferguson: “Christian is an active body with an effective pick-and-pop skillset. He utilizes his length very well to rebound and alter shots. He can also bring it up in transition and runs well for his size. He has great upside.” Ferguson is at a strong crossroads between productivity and long-term potential, so his continued growth could make him even more appealing to college coaches.

 

#80: 5’9 ’22 Chandler McNeil (Lumberton, NC)

Moving onto a player that embraced the team concept and worked hard on both sides of the ball, Chandler McNeil. He’s a young, strong-bodied guard prospect with a solid feel for the game and the ability to make plays for himself and others. McNeil handles the ball well and doesn’t force the action on offense. He showed toughness defensively and hustled for every available rebound and loose ball. Next in his development process is working to add strength, as it will make him a more reliable finisher around the basket. Coach Abrams on McNeil: “Chandler is a hard worker with a positive attitude and the ability to accept coaching. He’s young but already plays hard and with his teammates. Chandler was able to knock down shots and score pretty well, but also showed a willingness to make passes to open teammates. He was very coachable and brought it to every game.” McNeil still has ample time to develop, so it’ll be interesting to see how he progresses going forward.

 

#83: 6’3 ’20 Jamel McGowan (Goose Creek, SC)

Finishing up, we look at a player that was among the most skilled and polished performers on this team, Jamel McGowan. He’s a wiry wing prospect with efficient three-level scoring ability and a quality feel for the game. McGowan is able to generate offense for himself or spot-up without the ball and knock down shots off the catch. He is a willing passer that doesn’t force the action and showcased some craftiness when attacking the basket. McGowan forced an abundance of turnovers by jumping into passing lanes, which led to numerous buckets in transition. Next in his development process is working on his ability to shoot off the dribble, as it would make him a more college-ready prospect. Coach Abrams on McGowan: “Jamel is a combo guard that rebounds well and plays with great effort on defense. He’s very unselfish with a great ability to get to the rim and finish strong.” McGowan is already a major contributor at Goose Creek, but this upcoming season could allow him to emerge as a true two-way leader.