Team 4

Coach: Kelvin Mills

 

#4: 4’9 ’24 Alexander Brodie (Wendell)

Starting things off, we look at a player that contributed nicely within the team concept throughout camp, Alexander Brodie. He’s a smart, wiry guard prospect with a fairly well-rounded offensive skillset. Brodie showed the ability to handle and pass the ball while attacking the basket whenever possible. Next in his development process is working to add strength, as it would likely make him a better shooter from distance. Coach Mills on Brodie: “Alexander has a pretty average all-around game. He plays good team defense and makes a priority to get back in transition. Alexander did find the basket and made some open shots. He’s a good passer that knows how to give maximum effort. He has a good attitude, high basketball IQ, and is fast to the ball on defense but must continue to develop his off-hand.” Brodie showed some quality flashes during his time at camp and could become a nice contributor with continued work.

 

#6: 4’10 ’27 Ridley Hightower (Wake Forest)

Next, we look at a player that was able to make a noticeable difference with his motor, especially for his age, Ridley Hightower. He’s a young, wiry guard prospect that already understands how to operate within a variety of different roles, knocking down shots, defending with purpose, and hustling for extra possessions whenever possible. Hightower has a nice feel for the game and does a great job of operating within the team concept. Next in his development process is working on the use of his off-hand, as it will make him a more complete offensive player. Coach Mills on Hightower: “Ridley is a spark plug. He has high energy and simply refuses to take a possession off. He runs the floor and gives 100% energy on both sides of the ball. He’s a very smart young man with nice passing instincts and the ability to be a playmaker at times. Ridley will grow and get stronger. For now, quickness is his best attribute.” Hightower did a great job of making his presence felt, especially for his size and age, and could be a prospect to watch progress.

 

#7: 4’11 ’25 Jon Mwanda (Wake Forest)

Moving onto a player that was really able to overwhelm the opposition with his motor and passing ability, Jon Mwanda. He’s a smart, well-rounded guard prospect that is capable of doing a little bit of everything. Mwanda is unselfish and looks to set up others whenever possible, but can also score as needed from multiple areas on the floor. Next in his development process is working on his ability to finish with his off-hand, as it would make him an even better finisher through traffic. Coach Mills on Mwanda: “Jon is a playmaker. After the first game, he started to let me coach him. At that point, he grew as a player and was able to help his team while scoring more frequently. He’s a good ball-handler with nice IQ and lots of speed. Jon knows how to get open and score. He gave maximum effort all day long.” Mwanda showcased a lot of translatable skills and has the tools to become a very intriguing prospect.

 

#18: 5’1 ’25 Kendall Lanier (Apex)

Continuing onto a player that was quietly one of the toughest, most reliable two-way performers on this team, Kendall Lanier. He’s a poised, two-way guard with no real weaknesses and an excellent balance between scoring and playmaking. Lanier can reliably create for himself or others, but also moves extremely well without the ball as a cutter and spot-up threat. Next in his development process is working to add strength to his wiry frame, as it would allow him to be more physical on defense. Coach Mills on Lanier: “Kendall is an outstanding passer! He was in the running for Mr. Playmaker. He’s a pass-first guy that sees things before they happen. Kendall also has the ability to finish buckets all-day in transition. He moves without the ball and possesses nice court vision. Kendall has very quick hands and feet, but can continue to work on his off-hand.” Lanier simply went about his business during camp and did a phenomenal job of contributing as a result, making him one to keep an eye on going forward.

 

#19: 5’11 ’24 Trey Manhertz (Apex)

Next, we look at a player that arguably possesses as much long-term upside as anyone in attendance, Trey Manhertz. He’s a long, wiry forward/post prospect with a nice amount of skill and the ability to play inside or out. Manhertz handles and shoots the ball well for his size and is capable of putting the ball on the floor whenever necessary. Next in his development process is working to become stronger, as it’ll only help build his post presence on both ends of the floor. Coach Mills on Manhertz: “Trey is a versatile scoring forward with a lanky and elastic body type. His points come in the midrange game, as he’s still working on his post moves. He’s a very good shot-blocker that averaged three blocks per game and was the best rim-protector at camp. Trey has a lot of work to do, but will get there with his positive attitude and love for the game. He can continue working on his off-hand and playing with a consistent motor.” Manhertz has a ton of tools and could be the best prospect from this event in the future, especially if he continues to work.

 

#20: 5’2 ’26 CP Perry (Salisbury)

Moving onto a player that made a pretty strong impression during the drills and carried that nicely into game play, CP Perry. He’s a wiry, team-first guard prospect with a nice array of offensive tools, including his very efficient three-point stroke. Perry is capable of handling the ball and creating for himself and others, but typically keeps the ball moving and operates as a spot-up threat from beyond the arc. Next in his development process is working on not getting down on himself and maintaining the shooter’s mentality. Coach Mills on Perry: “CP is a shooter!! Now, what he brings with that is a high basketball IQ, maximum effort, good team play, and that will to win that you can’t coach. CP is a good passer that makes the right pass. He has a good court sense and has been well-coached at a young age, making him one of the smartest players on the floor. He can continue to work on his off-hand.” Perry did a great job of making his presence felt and contributing, especially for his size/age, and could be a prospect to watch progress.

 

#23: 5’4 ’26 Trevor Manhertz (Apex)

Continuing onto a player that possesses a smoothness and advanced feel for the game that others simply do not, Trevor Manhertz. He’s a smart, wiry, well-rounded guard prospect that already has a ton of translatable tools at such a young age. Manhertz can handle the ball, create for himself or others, and spot-up, all while playing with a high motor and making consistently intelligent decisions on both ends of the floor. Next in his development process is working to add strength, as it will make him an even better finisher through traffic. Coach Mills on Manhertz: “Trevor is a nice spot-up shooter with good range. He is the most gifted as a shooter. In this day and age of the three-pointer, a player like Trevor is money in the bank. He also brings a midrange game that is very good. He’s a spot-on passer and quality ball-handler with a high motor. He can continue to work on his off-hand.” Manhertz made the game look effortless at times and will be one to watch grow over the next few years.

 

#30: 5’8 ’24 DeVaughn Brown (Sanford)

Finishing up, we look at a player that had no issue absolutely dominating during his time, DeVaughn Brown. He’s a strong, smart, athletic, lead-by-example guard prospect that has the all-around game to control the action on both ends of the floor. Brown immediately stood out in the drills as possibly the most gifted player in the gym and simply carried that into the game play. No one was able to stop his strong drives to the basket, but Brown also showed the ability to knock down jumpers from all levels, rebound into pushing the break, and create reliably for his teammates. Next in his development process is working to get his three-point consistency to match his finishing ability, as it would make him virtually unstoppable. Coach Mills on Brown: “DeVaughn was camp MVP. He is a young stud with a high basketball IQ. He’s a team player with good passing skills. DeVaughn is versatile and showed his ability to play either guard position. He has a distinct ability to score the basketball. His toughness and athletic ability come from playing football. He has the ability to get to the rim or shoot it from outside. Right now, DeVaughn is a young guard with a wealth of tools. He’ll be one to watch as he grows.” Brown was utterly dominant and won the MVP award in phenomenal fashion, which should certainly grab the attention of folks going forward.